Air Plant Terrariums and Vases Monday, Dec 1 2014 

I stumbled on light bulb terrariums on one of my internet searches and I decided to make some. As it turns out it takes a bit more work to remove the innards of a light bulb than I wanted to do, and after removing the innards the entrance hole is still quite small. I found a nice alternative — glass ornaments.

air plant terrarium / bayareaassistant.com

Supply List:

Tillandsia’s (air plants)

Glass ornaments (tops removed) and other suitable containers

Sand and/or perlite

Rubber bumpers (sold at hardware stores)

Small figures and ornaments such as: rocks, shells, twigs, moss

Tweezers

Chopsticks

Cardboard or a funnel

Supplies / bayareaassistant.com

How to make the terrariums:

First, water your Tillandsia and let it dry. Now take your container, and if it is round add the bumpers to where you want the bottom to be. This will keep your container stabilized. Then fill the container about a third of the way up with sand or perlite using a funnel or a flexible piece of cardboard. Add your Tillandsia and figures. Use your tweezers and chopsticks to position the plant and the figures. It’s that easy. Now go be creative!

light bulb terrarium / bayareaassistant.com

Here is where to find information on caring for air plants 

terrarium vase / bayareaassistant.com

The Pros & Cons of Gravel & Rocks in your Garden via Houzz.com Monday, May 27 2013 

Container Gardening Tips via Houzz.Com Sunday, Jul 15 2012 

Plant a Pothole via Houzz.Com Sunday, Jul 8 2012 

ReUse / ReCycle in the Garden via Houzz.Com Monday, Jun 25 2012 

Home Staging Tips via Houzz.Com Sunday, Jun 17 2012 

Waiting for the rain to stop Friday, Mar 16 2012 

We are finally getting much-needed rain in the San Francisco Bay Area and all I can think of is gardening. I’ve been searching through photos of gardens to find ones that inspire me. Here are some of the photos I’ve found:

Tropical Garden: Island City House, Key West, FL

Roof Top Succulent Garden

English Cottage Garden

Shade Garden: Roger Foley, Sunset Books

Keeping Critters at Bay Wednesday, Mar 7 2012 

I have had raccoons coming in my yard for many years without any problems. Then about two years ago a raccoon discovered my dog door and came inside my house. Luckily I was home when it happened and scared the raccoon away. Since then, I have made sure to always lock up the dog door at dusk and that seemed to work. However, in the last several months I have been awakened in the middle of the night by a tap, tap, tapping at my back door, only to discover a raccoon trying to get in through the dog door.

I have done all of the preventive measures such as keep food, water, garbage and shelter unavailable to raccoons without success. Through some research I found some Raccoon Help and the solution is ammonia. Place a rag in a low, unbreakable container then pour ammonia on the rag, enough to cover the rag (the rag will help the ammonia from evaporating too fast). Next, put the container where you want to keep raccoons away, for me that was outside near the dog door. You can also use this method for keeping raccoons away from a lawn (you will need several ammonia stations for larger areas with multiple access points). Good luck!

Deck The Halls Wednesday, Dec 7 2011 

This year I wanted a tree, yet didn’t want a tree. I love the smell of a real tree, but not the mess. I found my solution — a bunch of Curly Willow branches. I don’t get the nice tree smell, but that’s a tradeoff I’m willing to take. This was quick and easy to put together. I just put the branches in a vase with rocks and hung chocolate ornaments on it — you could add lights and garlands if you wanted.  At the end of the season the ornaments will have been eaten and the branches can be saved for another year, planted if they root (Willow branches are fairly easy to root in water) or composted.

 

Garden Tips Sunday, Feb 13 2011 

To get the most from your garden follow a few simple guidelines:

Plant varying heights

Add some texture, whether it be from plants, sculptures or rocks

Plant in groupings

Create garden rooms

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