Change it up Tuesday, Sep 13 2022 

After moving into a new place, I found that some of my furniture didn’t have the right for my new space. I decided to give a few pieces a makeover, by changing the paint color and the knobs. I have now created what feels like brand new furniture and the pieces work so much better in my new home.

Media Cabinet Before

Media Cabinet After

Stand Out in a Crowd Thursday, Aug 20 2020 

An easy and fairly inexpensive way to update your yard is to paint your fence. A dark colored fence will really make your garden pop. Check out these before and after pictures of my side yard.

After – Black Fence

Before – Fence

You Should Be Doing This Wednesday, Feb 14 2018 

Why texting is better than calling or emailing in business (however know your audience):

  • Quicker response time
  • Can usually view and possibly respond to a text even in a meeting
  • More likely to see a text before an email
  • Quicker to view a text message, than to listen to a voice message

Send brief texts with all relevant info to ensure a better outcome

Welcome Thy Neighbor Sunday, Aug 7 2016 

The Making of the Gratitude Jar Wednesday, Jan 20 2016 

I had seen ‘The Gratitude Jar’ idea around for a few years and I finally decided to make one. They are really simple to put together, and they are a great way to remember the positives in life. For those of you unfamiliar with ‘The Gratitude Jar,’ it is simply a container (jar) that you put your positive, grateful, happy memories into. The tradition is to wait until the end of the year to open up the jar and read all of the notes, however the notes can be read whenever you like, especially if you need a little reminder that life’s not so bad. It’s never too late to start your own gratitude jar.

Here’s how:

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DIY Ornaments Sunday, Nov 30 2014 

DIY Ornaments / Bayareaassistant.com
Here is an easy, fun craft that you can do with your kids — Snow Ornaments with miniature figures. They will look great on your Christmas tree or lined up on your mantle, and they make great gifts.

Here is what you need to make these cute little ornaments: Supplies / bayareaassistant.com

Clear glass ornaments (available at craft stores)

Perlite (available at garden stores)

Small animals or figures (available at toy stores and/or craft stores)

Rubber bumpers (available at hardware stores)

Tweezers and/or chopsticks

Small soft brush on a wire (available at most drugstores in the cleaning isle)

Funnel or cardboard

Ribbon

bayareaassistant.comTake the ornament and add 4 bumpers to the bottom of the glass so the ornament will stand upright.













bayareaassistant.comNext, remove the top of the ornament and add the Perlite about 1/3 of the way up the ornament. Use a funnel or some cardboard to pour the Perlite in the ornament.

















making the horse ornament / bayareaassistant.comNow place your desired figure or small animal in the ornament. Once you get the figure in, use the tweezers or the chopsticks to position your figure. Once the figure is positioned, slightly tap the ornament to make sure the figure is stable. Once the figure is stable use your brush on the wire to clean off the dust from the inside of the ornament. If the figure falls over just reposition it.




German Shepherd Ornament / bayareaassistant.comPlace the top back on the ornament. Once the top is back on, you can add a ribbon to the top if you desire.

It’s Rough Out There Thursday, Apr 10 2014 

Cottage I manage a duplex in Berkeley for my family and see first hand how hard renting in the San Francisco Bay Area has become – for many it is harder than finding a good job. The Open Houses are packed with people, sometimes up to 50 applicants for one apartment (I hear in San Francisco the numbers are much higher), and the number of emails and inquiries are triple that.   After selecting the renter, I always send the other applicants an email to let them know they didn’t get the apartment. This past rental, several prospective tenants wanted to know if there was anything they could have done to improve their chances, and with some it was just a numbers game, but for others there were things they could have done that may have improved their chances.   Here are my tips:   It’s in the Details This is similar to finding and applying for a job. Read the rental Ad and follow any instructions listed in the Ad (how to contact, application/showing process, etc.) Pay attention to the details of the rental such as: vacancy, items included (parking, utilities, laundry), lease or month-to-month, pets allowed. Remember this is a very competitive process and the way you communicate with the landlord/rental agency may be considered in the end.  If the Ad is fairly descriptive and the rental process is outlined you should save your questions for the showing. Is it a Match? After reviewing the listing, make sure it works for your needs. If you need a place for six months, don’t waste time with a place that wants a one year lease, if you need a garage don’t waste time with a place that only has street parking, if you have a pet and the place does not take pets don’t waste time on it, etc. Also, check out the neighborhood of the apartment, either by using maps online or by going in person, but don’t bother the current occupants of the unit, you don’t want to be seen as pushy.   Be Flexible If the listing provides information on a public showing try to make it to the listed showing. Most landlords are overwhelmed with responses and they don’t need to and don’t have time to have several showings for an apartment.   Be Prepared Bring with you a current credit report that includes your credit score. Provide an explanation if your score is low. Bring proof of income (pay stubs, letter from current employer, etc.). If you don’t have a job but have plenty of funds, bring proof (bank statements, etc.). Bring the information you will need to fill out the application or bring an application that you have pre-filled out. The information you may need is: current and past employers, current and past residences, personal references, credit report, proof of income, and bring a pen. If you can, you might want to bring letters from current or past landlords or neighbors attesting to the type of tenant you are, this is especially useful if you are a dog owner.   Pets If you have a pet and pets are allowed, bring a pet resume (include a picture of the pet if you are not bringing the pet to the Open House) and references. Landords will want to know the pet is not going to be a problem. The San Francisco SPCA provides information for tenants on how to put together a  Pet Resume.   At the Showing When going to the showing make sure you park on the street and are considerate of the neighbors, you don’t want to be seen as pushy or entitled. Once there, take your time and really look at the place. I don’t suggest asking for an application or turning over your personal documents until you have spent some time looking at the unit and have asked some questions about the place. You want to clearly communicate your interest in the unit, so tell the landlord a little about yourself and the people/pets that would be living at the unit, and how it is the right place for you (be brief, especially if there are others waiting to speak to the landlord). Mention anything that might enhance the property for example, you like to garden and take pride in where you live.   It seems like a lot of work, but if you put a packet together you will be able to use it for multiple places, and it may make the difference in getting the place you want. Most landlords want hassle-free, low maintenance tenants, and the more you can convey that to the landlord, the more likely you will be chosen. Good luck in your search!

Make the Move Wednesday, Feb 12 2014 

Art Care Sunday, Jan 19 2014 

The Pros & Cons of Gravel & Rocks in your Garden via Houzz.com Monday, May 27 2013 

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